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Course Descriptions - New

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Courses with an asterisk (*) are CSI (Continuous Student Intake) courses. Students may be enrolled in these courses at any point through the school year prior to April 1 provided there is space. All CSI courses must be completed by the end of the school year.

  • Clicking on the subject areas links will provide you with a general description of the subject area.

  • Christian Ethics 10-30 is also available through CCS in cooperation with Holy Trinity School Division. Seats are limited.


English Language ArtsSciencePractical and Applied Arts
ELAA10* Science 10* Accounting 10
ELAB10* Computer Science 20* Accounting 20
ELA20*Computer Science 30* Accounting 30
Creative Writing 20 Health Science 20* Ag Tech Cow/Calf 10
ELAA30*
Environmental Science 20* Ag Tech Cow/Calf 20
​​ELAB30 * Physical Science 20*Ag Tech Cow/Calf 30
Chemistry 30 Ag Tech Crop Production 10
French Earth Science 30 (discontinued)
Construction and Carpentry 10 (discontinued)
French 10 (discontinued)
Physics 30 Cosmetology 10*
French 20 (discontinued) Cosmetology 20*
French 30 (discontinued)​Social Sciences Cosmetology 30*
History 10* Drafting 10 (discontinued)
Mathematics Native Studies 10*Energy and Mines 10
Math Foundations and Pre-Calculus 10* Native Studies 30* Energy and Mines 30 (discontinued)
Math Foundations 20 Psychology 20*Foods 30* (discontinued)
Math Pre-Calculus 20 Sports Psychology 20 Information Processing 10*
Math Foundations 30 Psychology 30 Life Transitions 30*
Math Pre-Calculus 30 Law 30Information Processing 10/Life Transitions* (discontinued)
Calculus 30 Photography 10*
Math Workplace and Apprenticeship 10* Christian Ethics Photography 20*
Math Workplace and Apprenticeship 20*Christian Ethics 10*​ (discontinued)
Photography 30*
Math Workplace and Apprenticeship 30* Christian Ethics 20* (discontinued)
Visual Arts 10*
Christian Ethics 30*​ (discontinued)
Visual Art 20*
Visual Art 30*
Wildlife Management 10
Wildlife Management 20
Wildlife Management 30






English Language Arts

The aim of the Saskatchewan English language arts curricula is to help students understand and appreciate language, and to use it confidently and competently in a variety of situations for learning, communication, work, life, and personal satisfaction.

ELAA10

Unit 1:  The Challenges of Life:  Challenges benefit both society and each individual; for without challenges, neither society nor the individual can move forward.

Unit 2: The Mysteries of Life:  Life is filled with mysteries from the extraordinary to the common.

For Required information and further information on this course click here.


Prerequisite: Grade 9 ELA

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ELAB1​​0

Unit 1:  Equality & Ethics

Unit 2: The World Around Us and Within Us

We witness or experience many stories of inequitable treatment in our lives and in the world around us. It is our responsibility to figure out who should be held accountable for the injustices and see to it that justice is sought, as we are all connected, which means we are all affected

For Required information and further information on this course click here.

Prerequisite: Grade 9 ELA

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ELA20


Unit 1: Starting Out and moving forward

As we journey on the road of life, we learn about ourselves, others, and the natural and constructed worlds. Childhood and youth lay the foundation for life, for learning and experiencing, for developing personal volition, for shaping identity and sense of self, and for health and well-being. The paths of childhood and youth are not the same for all, however.

Unit 2:  Moving Forward Establishing and Realizing

As the journey of life unfolds, young adults consider the many paths that they might forge and explore. Along the path are turning points and transitions that result in growth and transformation, new and altered roles, and different responsibilities (personal, family, academic, career, social).

For Required information and further information on this course click here.

Prerequisite: ELA A10 and ELA B10

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Creative Writing 20


This course provides opportunities for students to explore writing, have fun with it, see what others are writing and how they are writing it. Creative Writing allows for students to take time to refine abilities beyond those developed in the required ELA courses.  This course encourages students to see creative writing as a unique way of thinking, and as a means of constructing and conveying meaning. Students are encouraged to experiment with a variety of different writing styles and genres and to revise selected pieces to the point that they are polished.


Pre-requisite: ELAA10 and ELAB10​

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ELAA30 - Canadian Literature

The theme of this course is Canadian Identity.

Unit I - Canadian Perspectives: Distinct and Rich

The wealth of worldviews represented in Canada challenges us, individually and collectively, to define ourselves not just as individuals, but as a nation unique among other nations. Though we live in different regions, work at different endeavors, and experience different customs, lifestyles, and ways of knowing, we strive to live together to honor all the voices and perspectives that make this country great. Through our literature - in all its forms - we explore the issues that influence Canadian culture and Canadian identity.

Unit 2 - Canadian Landscapes: Diverse and Dynamic

Canada boasts a vast and varied landscape that inspires awe within and beyond its borders. Its geography, climate, resources, and seasons shape both the people who live here and the nation itself.

For Required information and further information on this course click here.

Prerequisite: ELA 20

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ELAA30 - Canadian Hockey Literature

The theme of this course is Canadian Identity.

Unit 1:  Canadian Perspectives: Distinct and Rich

In Canada we do not define ourselves just as individuals, but as a nation unique among other nations. Though we live in different regions, work at different endeavors, and experience different customs, lifestyles, and ways of knowing, most of us can identify with the Canadian sport of Hockey. Through our literature - in all its forms – we explore the thread that we call Canadian hockey and see how it has been sewn into our Canadian identity.

Unit 2:  Canadian Landscapes: Diverse and Dynamic

The importance of Canadian landscape (place) and its influence on Canadians cannot be underestimated; this too can be reflected in hockey. It is reflected in the places it is played (stadiums, rinks, ponds, etc…) It is also reflected in the psychological feeling, emotions and thoughts that make Canadians feel connected to the game of hockey.

For Required information and further information on this course click here.

Prerequisite: ELA 20

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ELAB30

The theme of this course is Global Perspectives.

Unit 1: The Search for Self-  In this unit, consider who you are, how you relate to others, how you develop your individual identity, what kind of identity you wish to create for yourselves throughout life, and how you respond to joys, inspiration, doubts, and fears.

Unit 2 : The Social Experience- In this unit, you examine, critique, and interrogate society and consider the actions you can take to create the kind of society in which you would like to live.

For Required information and further information on this course click here.

Prerequisite: ELA 20​​

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French (all French courses cancelled for the 2017-2018 school year)

This course will focus on developing the ability to use linguistic structures to communicate accurately and effectively. Students will comprehend and express a variety of language functions experienced in the form of oral or written texts.

French10

Units covered in French 10 include:

  • Voyages I - Souvenirs d'enfan​ce​
  • Novel Study - Petit Prince
  • Voyages I - à table
  • Voyages I - paroles et images

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French 20

French 20 continues to develop on the vocabulary, listening and grammar skills of grade 10. Topics include:
Francophone and other cultures
awareness of language 
lang​u​age​ learning
development of communicative competencies in French

Pre-requisite: French 10

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French 30


French 30 continues to develop on the vocabulary, listening and grammar skills of grade 11. Topics include:
communication strategies
social strategies
promoting positive​ attitudes

Pre-requisite: French 20




Mathematics

There are three academic math streams at the high school level. Students should be aware of the math necessary for their post secondary pursuits. Click here to access the Math Pathways.


Math Foundations and Pre-Calculus 10

This course provides students with critical thinking skills identified for entry to post-secondary programs. Topics in this course include:
  • factoring
  • radicals
  • exponents
  • measurement including surface area and volu​me
  • trigonometry
  • linear functions and equations
  • systems of linear equations
This pathway leads students on to Foundations 20 and further math classes required for university entrance for many programs.

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Math Foundations 20​


The main content areas of Foundations 20 include:
  • reasoning
  • triangle trigonometry
  • systems of linear inequalities
  • quadratic functions and equations
Content in this pathway will meet the needs of students intending to pursue careers in areas that typically require university but are not math intensive such as the humanities, fine arts, social science and nursing. Students require a copy of NELSON - Foundations Mathematics 11 (ISBN: 978-0-17-650170-6) ​

Pre-requisite: Math Foundations and Pre-Calculus 10

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Math Foundations 30

The main content areas in Foundations 30 include:
  • financial mathematics
  • set theory and notation
  • permutations​
  • combinations
  • probability
  • polynomial functions
  • exponential and logarithmic functions​
  • sinusoidal functions
Content in this pathway will meet the needs of students intending to pursue careers in areas that typically require university but are not math intensive such as the humanities, fine arts, social science and nursing.​

Pre-requisite: Math Foundations 20

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Math Pre-Calculus 20

The main content areas in Pre-Calculus 20 include:
  • absolute value
  • radicals
  • rational expressions and equations
  • trigonometric ratios
  • cosine law and sine law
  • factoring polynomial expressions
  • quadratic functions​ and equations
  • inequalities and arithmetic and geometric sequences and series
Content in this pathway will meet the needs of students interested in pursuing careers in science-related areas.

Pre-requisite: Math Foundations and Pre-Calculus 10

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Math Pre-Calculus 30

Pre-Calculus 30 will focus on trigonometry and curves of polynomials. Topics include:
  • trigonometric graphs and identities
  • logs and exponents
  • transformations and functions
The course will give students the necessary problem solving skills and approaches to be successful in their university math courses.

Pre-requisite: Math Pre-Calculus 20

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Calculus 30​​

The main content areas covered in Calculus 30 include:
  • trigonometric​ functions
  • identities
  • transformations
  • polynomial functions
  • rational functions
  • exponential functions
  • logarithmic functions
Content in Calculus will meet the needs of students interested in pursuing careers in math and science related areas. Calculus is not required for university entrance, but may increase achievement in a first year university math class.
  
Pre-requisite: Math Pre-Calculus 30 (or taking concurrently)

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Workplace and Apprenticeship Math 10

WAM10 teaches students great real-life math skills. This course is pre-requisite for further studies in Workplace Math. Topics include:
  • proportions (unit pricing and currency exchange)
  • income
  • measurement (metric and imperial)
  • angles and lines
  • similar polygons
  • trigonometry
Required Resources: MathWorks10 (Pacific Education Press ISBN978-1-895766-51-6)

This course will provide students with the skills for entry into the majority of trades and direct entry into the work force.

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​​​Workplace and Apprenticeship Math 20

WAM20 extends WAM 10 with topics including:

  • preservation of equality
  • surface area
  • volume and capacity
  • right triangles
  • 3-D objects
  • personal budgets
  • compound interest​
  • account types and other financial institution services
  • slope
  • proportional thinking and representing​ date using graphs

This course will provide students with the skills for entry into the majority of trades and direct entry into the work force. Students require a copy of MathWorks 11 ISBN 978-1-89576-692-9 from Pacific Educational Press. 

Pre-requisite: Workplace and Apprenticeship Math 10

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Workplace and Apprenticeship Math 30

WAM 30 is the final course in the Workplace and Apprenticeship pathway and includes the following topics:

  • logical reasoning and problem solving
  • sine and cosine law
  • triangles, quadrilaterals​ and polygons
  • transformation of 2 and 3-D shapes
  • finance math
  • linear relations
  • mean, median and mode
  • percentiles 
  • probability
This course will provide students with the skills for entry into the majority of trades and direct entry into the work force. Students require a copy of MathWorks 12  from Pacific Educational Press​. ​

Pre-requisite: Workplace and Apprenticeship Math 20

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Science
There are three academic science pathways at the high school level. Students should consider their future career paths when selecting science courses. Click here to access the Science Pathways .

Science 10​

This course is an introduction to all further high school science courses and combines life science, earth science, and physical science through three major themes. Students will investigate:
  • motion of objects
  • role of forces in causing motion
  • characteristics and rates of chemical reactions
  • representing chemical reactions using equations
  • factors influencing earth's climate​ and ecosystems
  • role of human actions and feedback mechanisms
  • careers related to the field
​Science 10 is the pre-requisite course for all high school science courses. 

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Computer Science 20

Students in Computer Science will develop their problem solving and programming skills through this course. Students will also explore:
  • basics of software and hardware systems
  • cyber safety and copyright issues
  • flowcharting and problem solving
  • Scratch programming
  • Python programming - variable, conditionals, functions, looping and lists
  • career and currents issues
Students should be self motivated with average to above average problem solving and logic skills. This course is a great option for students interested in comptuer related careers following high school. There is a high demand for Computer​ Science students in the work force.

Pre-requisite: Science 10

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Computer Science 30

Computer Science 30 is an extension of 20 and allows students to further build on their programming skills. Students will further study:
  • software and hardware systems
  • problem solving methods
  • program writing - assignment statements, variables, constants, operators, definite and indefinite loops, conditionals, functions and lists
  • software design using Java
  • impact of information technology on society
  • careers involving programming
All of the programs created are game based or graphical in nature. Students will develop a fully functional​ game as a final coding project. Students may be interested in careers in IT such as: mobile application developer, software engineer, database architect, graphic designer, information security specialist, network administrator.

Pre-requisite: Computer Science 20

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Health Science 20

This course will challenge you to look at the health science field from holistic and analytic perspectives to give you a basis for making sound personal health choices. Topics include:
  • philosophies and ethics
  • nutrition and metabolism
  • medical diagnostics
  • basic anatomy and physiology of the human body 
  • normal and abnormal functioning of various body systems 
  • health science careers
Students taking Health Science may be interested in careers in health including nursing.

Pre-requisite: Science 10

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Environmental Science 20

Students will learn how to examine local and global environmental issues such as:
  • climate change
  • water
  • soil ​and air quality
  • urbanization
  • bior​esource management
  • waste handling and disposal
  • land use planning
  • impact of agriculture and industry
  • environmental science related careers
This course is well suited for students going into careers in conservation, wildlife and park management.

Pre-requisite: Science 10

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Physical Science 20

This course combines Chemistry and Physics in an integrated manner to investigate the following:
  • heating and cooling
  • foundations of Chemistry
  • quantitative analysis of molecules and chemical reactions
  • characteristics​ and properties of waves
  • public and private science in agriculture, industry and universities
Students should have a strong math background and fundamental understanding of Science 10 concepts. This course prepares students to continue on with Physics or Chemistry and onto university level sciences.

Pre-requisite: Science 10

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Chemistry 30

A major focus of the course is the study of the role of chemical properties and bonds in determining what makes materials suitable for use in specific applications. Students will:
  • Investigate the nature of equilibrium in chemical reactions
  • Explore oxidation-reduction reactions
  • Study the impact of electrochemistry on society and the environment
  • Other topics of exploration include organic compounds and acid-base chemistry
Chemistry is considered the central science so this course is beneficial to students going into a wide range of careers including human or animal health, environment, engineering, agriculture, hair dressing, teaching and even aspects of business and communication.

Pre-requisites: Physical Science 20

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Earth Science 30

In Earth Science 30, students will examine Earth as a planet including:
  • plate tectonics and geologic time scale
  • surface geography
  • the three rock families
  • connections to mineral deposits and economic resources
  • interaction of Earth’s changing atmosphere and hydrosophere
​Students will also carry out student directed projects related to current events in Earth Science that interest them.

This​ is a good course for students interested in Geography, Geology, Environmental Management, Mining etc...

Pre-requisites: Environmental Science 20 or Physical Science 20 

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Physics 30

The major focus of Physics 30 will be the study of 4 major physical concepts:
  • conservation laws including momentum and energy​
  • fields including gravitation, electrical and magnetic
  • motion and force
  • modern physics including atomic and quantum mechanics

The course will provide students with a full set of skills in equation manipulation, scientific method and exploration and inquiry. Students taking Physics should have a strong understanding of mathematics and formula isolation.

Pre-requisite: Physical Science 20

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Social Science

Social Science courses focus on society and the relationships of people within society. Students in these courses analyze human behaviour and the interaction of people depending on things like world view.


History 10

The main focus of study in History 10 is centered on decision making. Throughout the course we’ll look at key factors that have impacted and will continue to impact decision makers. Main units include:

  • ​Social organizations​​
  • ​contracts and world view
  • French Revolution
  • Industrial Revolution
  • Nation States
  • Imperialism
  • WWI

  • Throughout the course students will be expected to draw on the information they read to analyze past and current events. One social science credit at the grade 10 level is required for graduation.

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    Native Studies 10

    Native Studies 10 focuses on what has shaped Aboriginal identity and culture. This course will include the following topics:
    • identity - what has shaped Aboriginal culture
    • history - effects of fur trade, social structure, residential schools, legislation and treaties
    • current factors
    • future considerations
    ​​Native Studies 10 fulfills the social science requirement at the grade 10 level and is a good course for students thinking of careers in fields related to humanities, education and law enforcement.

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    Native Studies 30​

    This course will examine contemporary Canadian aboriginal issues in the context of Aboriginal history, helping students develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal realities in Saskatchewan and Canada.  This course will look at topics including:

    • aboriginal and treaty rights
    • governance and land claims
    • treaty land entitlement
    • economic and social development
    Native Studies 30 fulfills the social science requirement at the grade 12 level and is a good course for students thinking of careers in fields related to humanities, education and law enforcement.

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    Psychology 20

    This introductory course is designed to provide students with a general overview of the field of psychology and grand theories. Throughout the course, students will study topics which include:
    • social psychology
    • personal identity
    • how we make sense of the world
    • how we act and interact in a social world
    This course fulfills a social science credit at the 20 level and is good for students entering general studies, education and the humanities.

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    Sports Psychology 20
    Sports Psychology 20 covers the same outcomes as Psychology 20 but is taught in the context of sport. This course is good for students who may be more apt to learn about social psychology in the context of their interest in sport or sport psychology. Students will work through six units of study that include:
    • foundations
    • confidence​ and focus
    • motivational
    • mental, social and emotional factors
    This course fulfills a social science credit. Students successfully completing this course will receive a Psychology 20 credit on their transcripts so students should not take both Psychology 20 and Sports Psychology 20.

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    Psychology 30

    This course explores the development of a human across a lifespan. It looks specifically at impacts on development such as maturation, cognitive and physical skills, heredity, family, Socio-economic Status, culture, and ethnicity. It looks at many developmental psychologists' theories of development.



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    Law 30

    The Law 30 course is designed to assist students to become active, informed and productive citizens who know and understand their legal rights and responsibilities. Through the course, students develop an understanding of the concept of rule of law, and learn that the law reflects, and is shaped by society's values and attitudes regarding social and human relationships.

    The Law 30 Course is divided into five units:

    • Foundations of Canada's Legal System
    • Criminal Law
    • Civil Law
    • Family Law
    • Labour Law
    Law 30 is a very self-directed.  You will need to spend about three hours per week in the course.  Activities are self-corrected and explained using podcasts​. Law is a social science credit at the 30 level and is good for students interested in social justice and fields related to law.




    Christian Ethics

    Christian Ethics encourages students to learn more about their faith and themselves in a positive and supportive atmosphere. These classes are sponsored jointly by Holy Trinity Catholic School Division and Chinook School Division.

    Christian Ethics 10

    This class is designed for both those with and those without Biblical knowledge. Topics in this course include:
    • learning about yourself
    • making plans for the future
    • how the Bible came to be
    • the Gospels
    • history of the Jewish people
    • dating and sexuality
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    Christian Ethics 20​


    This class is often recommended for students that have completed CE10 and CE30. The main focus of this course is the history of Christianity including:


    • values
    • ethics
    • morality​ 
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    Christian Ethics 3​0​

    This class focuses on the different aspects of a Christian lifestyle. Topics in this course include:
    • self esteem
    • communication
    • faith
    • dating
    • marriage
    • sexuality 
    • seven major world religions




    Practical and Applied Arts

    PAA are courses that are essential elements of the basic education of all students and should be considered an important part of a students well-rounded education. There are many courses available though the PAA subject area with all providing an opportunity for students to develop new skill sets.

    Accounting

    The aim of Accounting is to provide students with the opportunity to develop a basic understanding of the accounting cycle and develop the problem-solving and decision making skills used to interpret accounting and financial information. Students considering Accounting may be interested in going on to careers in: bookkeeping, accounting, banking, payroll and income tax clerks.

    ​​​Accounting 10

    ​Accounting 10 focuses on the covering the accounting cycle for a service business. Topics in this course include:
    • Introduction to Accounting - accounting cycle, the accounting equation, balance sheets and charts of accounts
    • Understanding Transactions - entering transactions into the accounting equation and a ledger, debit and credit
    • Accounting Software - entering account names, opening financial position and exporting to spreadsheets
    • Transitions in Journals - two column general journal, combination journal, posting transactions and creating trial balances
    • Work Sheet and Financial Statements - preparing a work sheet to determine the net income or net loss​, Income Statement and Balance Sheet
    • Closing entries and Banking - completing the accounting cycle, banking

    All students will complete a final project for a service business as a cumulative assignment. 





    Accounting 20 focuses on completing the accounting cycle for a merchandising business.  Major topics in this course include:
    • Inventory Control - inventory methods
    • Payroll Accounting - hourly and overtime pay, time cards, payroll taxes
    • Transactions related to Purchases - purchases on account, returns, cash payments, corrections
    • Transactions related to Sales - sales of merchandise, sales returns and allowances, cash receipts
    • Work Sheet and Financial Statements - income statement, distribution of net income or loss, capital statement and balance sheets
    • Adjusting and Closing Entries - recording and posting closing entries, post closing trial balance
    • Income Tax - preparing income tax for students and single, employed person​
    Pre-requisite: Accounting 10

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    Pre-requisite: Accounting 20



    AgTech Production

    The aim of Cow/Calf Production is to provide students with knowledge, skills and abilities in Cow/Calf Production including farm safety procedures, communication skills and basic knowledge of machinery and livestock equipment operation as well as the care and handling of beef cattle. Students choosing these courses may be interested in the following careers: rancher, veterinarian, animal trainer, animal breeder, animal scientist, animal caretaker, veterinary assistant.


    Main focus areas in Cow Calf 10 include:
    • cattle nutrition
    • livestock handling equipment
    • beef cattle health
    • pen and pasture maintenance
    • riding and handling a horse

    A work experience manual must be completed which will become a record of at least 30 hours of work experience completed with a farmer trainer. Students are responsible for finding a suitable trainer for the course. Students will reflect on their work experience during the course and keep track of their hours. The farmer trainer will verify the hours and submit a short evaluation at the end of the course.

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    Main focus areas in Cow Calf 20 include:
    • veterinary drugs
    • repair and maintenance of cow/calf facilities
    • livestock handling equipment
    • beef handling
    • marketing

    A work experience manual must be completed which will become a record of at least 30 hours of work experience completed with a farmer trainer. Students are responsible for finding a suitable trainer for the course. Students will reflect on their work experience during the course and keep track of their hours. The farmer trainer will verify the hours and submit a short evaluation at the end of the course.



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    Main focus areas in Cow Calf 30 include:
    • animal identification
    • pasture management
    • cattle behaviour​​
    • culling and breeding
    • ​cattle anatomy
    A work experience manual must be completed which will become a record of at least 30 hours of work experience completed with a farmer trainer. Students are responsible for finding a suitable trainer for the course. Students will reflect on their work experience during the course and keep track of their hours. The farmer trainer will verify the hours and submit a short evaluation at the end of the course.



    The aim of Field Crop Production is to provide students with knowledge, skills and abilities in field crop production including farm safety procedures, communication skills, and basic knowledge of equipment operation and procedures. Topics for this course include:

      • farm safety
      • planning for field crop production
      • farm equipment maintenance and repair
      • marketing 
      • biotechnology
      • basic operation of tillage and seeding equipment

    work experience manual must be completed which will become a record of at least 30 hours of work experience completed with a farmer trainer. Students are responsible for finding a suitable trainer for the course. Students will reflect on their work experience during the course and keep track of their hours. The farmer trainer will verify the hours and submit a short evaluation at the end of the course.

    Students taking this course may be interested in the following careers: farmer, agricultural machinery technician, agricultural engineer, food scientist, truck driver, construction equipment operator.




    Construction 10

    Construction and Carpentry 10 will expose students to the processes and skills required to construct a typical residential dwelling and the potential careers associated with residential construction and carpentry. Topics that will be covered with the course include:

    • industry safety
    • wood and building materials
    • tools and equipment
    • foundations
    • wall framing
    • roof framing
    • career opportunities

    Major activities will include building a model of a car garage. This garage will start with a concrete pad followed by framing the four walls, building the rafters and sheathing the entire structure. This model garage will be built in the exact same way with the exact same parts as a real garage.

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    Cosmetology

    Cosmetology 10


    In this course you will need to like to work with your hands and not be afraid to give a manicure, facial, or make-up application to someone else.  You will be working on a mannequin for the hairstyling units and then working on clients for the manicure, facial, and make-up units.  Some of the assignments in the manicure, hairstyling, and make-up units can be done on yourself but not all of them.  You will also need to be a visual learner as the bulk of the course is video instruction that you will have to complete either a mannequin or a client.

    The course topics covered are:
      • ​Salon Housekeeping (sanitation in the salon)
      • Hairstyling (braiding, blow drying, curling iron)
      • Nail Care (Manicures)
      • Skin Care (Facials)
      • Make-up Application
      • Shampoo and Rinses
    This course requires students to get up from the computer and work hands on with their kits. Cosmetology is a great option for students interested in hair styling and esthetics.




    In this course you will need to like to work with your hands and not be afraid to give a manicure, facial, or make-up application to someone else.  You will be working on a mannequin for the hairstyling units and then working on clients for the manicure, facial, and make-up units.  Some of the assignments in the manicure, hairstyling, and make-up units can be done on yourself but not all of them.  You will also need to be a visual learner as the bulk of the course is video instruction that you will have to complete either a mannequin or a client.

     The course topics covered are:
      • Hairstyling (roller-sets, up-dos, finger waves)
      • Nail Care (Paraffin Wax Manicures)
      • Skin Care (Paraffin Wax Facials)
      • Make-up Application (Formal application, ex: wedding make-up)
      • Hair Removal (waxing)
      • Hair Treatments (deep conditioners)




    In this course you will need to like to work with your hands.  Much of this course will be completed on your mannequin, although there are a few occasions where you may have the opportunity to work on clients. You will also need to be a visual learner as the bulk of the course is video instruction that you will have to transfer to your mannequin.

    The course topics covered are:
      • Hair Coloring (virgin, retouch, foil, and cap application.  This will initially be done with gel rather than with actual color)
      • Hair Cutting (on mannequin)
      • Nail Care (Gel Nail Polish)
      • Scalp Care (Scalp Massage)
      • Salon Management (creating a business plan and design for opening a salon)
      • Work Study (work experience in a salon)
      • Other units of study may be applied depending on student interest and ability and salon involvement.
    This course requires a placement in a salon for approximately 10-20 hours. When you are placed in your salon you will need to bring your mannequin and cosmetology kit and a laptop or something to be able to watch your videos with.  When there is time in the salon where your supervisor does not need you should be completing your assignments on your mannequin.





    Drafting 10

    Technical drawings are essential to constructing everything in society from the house one lives in to the computer on a desk.  These drawings, created by a draftsperson, must be understood by hundreds of other people in our society. The Drafting 10 course is designed to promote understanding and application of the graphical language used in technical drawings. Topics in Drafting 10 include:

    • CAD Basics - Using Google Sketch Up​
    • Basic Manual Drafting
    • Sketching and Freehand Drawing
    • Multiview Drawings
    • Pictorial Drawings
    • Dimensioning
    • Sectional Views
    • Career Opportunities
    Drafting 10 is an excellent course option for students interested in careers in architecture and design.​



    Energy and Mines

    Energy and Mines is a Practical and Applied Arts (PAA) initiative that is modular in nature and is designed to give students the background and knowledge necessary to evaluate potential career options and gain some insight into the role of the energy and mining sectors in Saskatchewan: historically, presently and​ into the future.


    Course topics include:
      • Introduction to Energy and Mines
      • Review of Saskatchewan Physical Geography
      • Saskatchewan Geology and Geological History
      • Sustainability
      • Oil and Gas - Formation, Location and Exploration
      • Oil and Gas - Production

    Course topics include:
      • alternative, renewable and sustainable​ energy sources
      • offshore oil
      • hydroelectricity
      • wind, solar​​ and geothermal energy

    Energy and Mines courses are great course options for students interested in geology and the energy sector.





    The Food Studies curriculum focuses on essential knowledge and understanding of food and nutrition. It stresses the importance of making healthy food choices in order to promote the well-being of individuals and families. It also aims to develop self-reliance, independence, and positive social skills as well as to teach basic life skills and knowledge that all students need. This course will focus on topics that include:
    • consumer Knowledge: To develop knowledge that will enable students to make wise buying choices when shopping for food
    • personal Skills: To allow students to cultivate practical skills that can be used daily in the preparation of foods
    • technological Advances: To gain knowledge of the changes in the production of food and the many conveniences that can be attributed to technological advances
    • careers and employment: To create an awareness of the career opportunities in the fields of Food and Nutrition
    • food preparation and categories
    • relationship between food and health
    • food safety and sanitation
    ​Food Studies is a great course option for student who are or will be living on their own and those considering careers in dietetics, food journalism/photography, chef/cook, health inspector, restaurant management and teaching.


    Information Processing is a general computer application and processing course. The course covers the following topics:

    • keyboarding - developing touch typing skills
    • evolution of technology
    • hardware and software terminology
    • digital citizenship
    • word processing
    • spreadsheets
    • presentation software
    This course is an excellent option for all students in high school as it covers so many tools that are useful for other classes, in the workforce or at post secondary schooling.




    Life Transitions 30

    This course is designed to help students explore some of the personal, family, community and career transitions that they face now and in the future. Students will examine the following:
    • life roles
    • health self care
    • conflict in relationships
    • money management
    • career planning
    • independent living
    • job search
    • sexual and reproductive health
    • parenting
    ​This course is a great option for student who will be or are living on their own as well as students considering careers in money management, social work, healthcare, counselling, job placement and teaching positions.





    This double credit course is built to provide students with the opportunity to work gain skills in Information Processing to complete assignments for Life Transitions. Core curriculum content is fully covered for both courses so this class will take longer than a semester timeframe. Topics covered in this double credit course include:
    • life roles, keyboarding and computers
    • health self care and technology
    • conflict in relationships and effective communication writing
    • money management and spreadsheets
    • career planning and digital citizenship
    • job search and resume and cover letter design
    • independent living
    • sexual and reproductive health
    • parenting and presentations tools
    Thi is a great course option for students who may be heading right into the work force as major life and employability skills are gained. 

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    Photography

    The photography courses are meant to help students gain skills in digital photography and editing. Cameras are provided.


    This course includes some choice based on student interest, as well as basic concepts such as:
    • composition
    • exposure
    • introduction to camera functions
    • introduction to photo editing 





    This course includes topics such as:
    • aperture
    • shutter speed
    • introduction to portraits 
    • introduction to lighting
    • intermediate photo editing




    The 30 level of photography continues to build on the knowledge and skills from 10 and 20. The following topics are continued in 30:
    • advanced composition
    • exposure
    • aperture
    • shutter speed
    • lighting
    Students will plan, execute and market a photo shoot for a client. Photography is a great option for students interested in professional photography.




    Visual Art

    The Art Education program has one major aim: to enable students to understand​ and value arts expressions throughout life.  There are three components to the Visual Art 10, 20 and 30 courses:
    • The creative/productive component where you will have the opportunity in each unit to create at least one major Visual Art creation surrounding the theme and artists studied in each unit. The focus will be on applying the elements and principles of art effectively in all your works.
    • The cultural/historical component where you will have the opportunity to learn about art from various cultures and time periods by studying different artists and art themes.
    • The critical/responsive component where you will have the opportunity to go through the viewing process of various artworks to develop a critical eye: you will describe, analyze, interpret, and evaluate artworks from a variety of mediums, artists and time periods.


    Visual ​Art 10 focuses on:
    • Visual Art and ways of thinking
    • international Visual Art
    • local and regional culture
    • functional art
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    Visual Art 20 focuses on:
    • popular culture and mass media
    • cultural communities of Canada
    • microgr​aphy
    • sculptural form
    • artists who inspire

    Visual Art 30 focuses on:
    • change
    • social issues in Visual Art
    • the Group of Seven
    • self identify
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    Wildlife Management

    The aim of Wildlife Management is to provide students with the opportunity to study beliefs and attitudes about wildlife. 


    This course is designed as an introduction to Wildlife Management and will focus on the following:
    • adaptations of organisms
    • human impact
    • water
    • grasslands and prairies
    • forestry
    • tourism/outdoor skills
    • career opportunities
    • environmental impact

    This course builds on concepts from Wildlife 10 and focuses on:
    • ecological footprints, populations and​ traditional​ perspectives
    • wildlife areas ands species
    • interactions of wildlife and society
    • issues in wildlife
    • hunting and game handling (inter-module choice) - firearm safety, archery or tracking/orienteering
    • outdoor skills development
    • park development project

    This course covers topics including:
    • outdoor skill development
    • regulated hunting
    • fishing and​ aquatic environment
    • interactions with wildlife and society
    • issues in wildlife
    • making a difference
    • applications of wildlife research​
    • managing wildlife space or species
    • optional work study module
    ​Although there are no pre-requisites for any of the Wildlife courses, students will find it easier to gain understanding of higher level concepts if they've taken all the courses.






















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